BUILDING AND SUSTAINING RESEARCH CAPACITY

We believe that building and sustaining research capacity, particularly in resource-limited, research-naïve areas, will help address public health issues around the globe.

BUILDING RESEARCH CAPACITY

Watch the video to learn how our teams support sites to develop sustainable research capacity and produce high-quality study data. In addition, we work with regional institutions to establish networks of research-ready sites that focus on local health and research priorities.

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Partnership of Clinical Research in Guinea (PREGUI) and Partnership for Research on Vaccines and Infectious Diseases in Liberia (PREVAIL)

After their respective Ebola outbreaks, the Ministry of Health of both countries formed partnerships with the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of Clinical Research (DCR) to help build local research capacity.
FHI Clinical oversees and facilitates the execution and contractual requirements of in-country logistics. These tasks include sourcing, procuring and shipping; administrative and facilities staff hiring; staff training, including good clinical practice, laboratory practices, data management, computer skills and record keeping; facility management; and renovation project management.
To equip the PREVAIL network and other key representatives in Liberia with the ability to respond to ongoing health issues and potential outbreaks, FHI Clinical assisted with providing training that covered the basics of clinical research.

China Tuberculosis Clinical Trials Consortium (CTCTC)

In September 2013, Beijing Chest Hospital (BCH) initiated the China TB Clinical Trials Consortium (CTCTC) as a multi-site, national consortium dedicated to building research infrastructure for multinational TB clinical trial research collaboration in China.

From 2013 through 2020, FHI Clinical provided technical support and guidance to implement strategies for clinical trial capacity building as well as online, on-site or workshop-based training to develop research capacity.

SUSTAINING RESEARCH CAPACITY

Keeping a site functional preserves investment in human and equipment resources and ensures the site is ready to conduct quality research as soon as there is a need. 

Working together, we can develop high-quality sites that are ready to accept new projects. 

Learn more about our specific experience through our case studies:

Case Study
Phase II Trial of a Chikungunya Vaccine in the Caribbean

Phase II Trial of a Chikungunya Vaccine in the Caribbean

The study team maintained a 91% retention rate in a study of a Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) vaccine, despite study disruptions due to natural disasters, including Hurricane Maria, and political unrest near the sites in five Caribbean countries in a CHIKV endemic region.
Case Study
Clinical Research Training to Support Capacity Building in Liberia

Clinical Research Training to Support Capacity Building in Liberia

To equip Liberia with the ability to respond to ongoing health issues and potential outbreaks, a US government contract provided funding to train local leaders in Liberia’s clinical research infrastructure network. The training aimed to build a solid foundation to conduct international quality clinical research.
Case Study
Building Capacity for Tuberculosis Research in China: The China TB Clinical Trials Consortium (CTCTC)

Building Capacity for Tuberculosis Research in China: The China TB Clinical Trials Consortium (CTCTC)

To help address the high global TB incidence and related death rate, the China TB Clinical Trials Consortium (CTCTC) was established by government and industry partners to help build clinical research capacity in China, which has a particularly high tuberculosis incidence.
Case Study
Rapid Study Start-Up for the Sierra Leone Trial to Introduce a Vaccine Against Ebola (STRIVE)

Rapid Study Start-Up for the Sierra Leone Trial to Introduce a Vaccine Against Ebola (STRIVE)

Within a challenging, resource-limited setting, the project team succeeded in reaching FP/FV six weeks after arrival in Sierra Leone and 99.998% accuracy of the planned-to-execute budget.